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  • University of Illinois, Carle and OSF HealthCare attack overwhelming infection using engineering-based medicine

  • Dr. Bashir explains how the Jump simulation center creates physician innovators and inventors

  • Finalist in the 2014 FDA food safety challenge. One of 5 finalist for a half million price

  • Prof. Bashir instrumental in the first major gift to new UI med school.

  • Dr. Bashir Podcast featured on ASME: Engineering Bio-Hybrid Devices

  • Ritu Raman wins the 2015 Illinois Innovation price!

  • LIBNA graduate students highlight on UIUC graduate college website

  • Illinois International Graduate Achievement Award for Gregory Damhorst for his research focused on HIV/AIDS, his development of the Global Health Initiative

  • AAAS: In Biomedical Engineering, Experts See Big Research Opportunities and Some Funding Challenges

  • LIBNA graduate students broadened their research horizons this summer at National University of Singapore

  • Bio-bots featured in news worldwide!
  • NBC News | Forbes | Yahoo News | CNET | Popular Mechanics | Science Daily | NSF | Live Science | Tech Crunch

  • Skeletal Muscle Powered Bio-Bots Featured in Illinois News. Congratulations Caroline and Ritu! Watch Video on YouTube

  • Maggie Sobieraj chosen as a 2014 recipient for the MCB Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship

  • Middle school students in Louisville, KY publish article discussing Bashir group biobots

  • CD4+/CD8+ T Cell counter featured on cover of Science Translational Medicine

  • Biobot work mentioned on

  • Watch: The Grainger Engineering Breakthroughs Initiative

  • LIBNA group hosts EBICS REU Students

  • Undergrad Lorraine De Jesús Kim wins Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) Outstanding Young Researcher Award

  • Dr. Bashir featured on AAAS Member Central website

  • Dr. Bashir featured in video on IEEE Life Sciences website

  • Mayo Clinic and Illinois researchers develop new sensor for methylated DNA:
    link 1 | link 2

  • Bio-bots featured in news worldwide!
    Online: NBC News | BBC News Tech | CNN Money | Discovery News | National Geographic | Popular Mechanics | Scientific American | The Scientist | Txchnologist by GE | Atlantic Wire | IEEE Spectrum | Illinois News Bureau | NASA Tech Brief

    In Print: The Daily Illini | The Chicago Tribune | The Daily Item | The Los Angeles Times |
    Also syndicated by the New York Times

    Videos: PBS "Chicago Tonight" | Mashable | Engineering Newswire
    To appear in: Biofutur (France), Plàstico Industrial (Brazil)

  • Smart Bandages Grow Blood Vessels feature on InsideScienceTV

  • High school student Chelsea Edwards works with Bashir lab as part of I-STEM program

  • Prof. Bashir wins EMBS Technical Achievement Award for significant contributions to the development of micro and nanoscale biosensors

  • Vincent featured in EBICS Experimental methods for Biological Machines video

  • LIBNA group making tissue bandage for heart

  • Watkins develops award-winning product that could improve AIDS treatment

  • Team designs a bandage that spurs, guides blood vessel growthTeam designs a bandage that spurs, guides blood vessel growth

  • Prof. Bashir co-guest edits the November/December 2011 issue of IEEE Pulse on BioMEMS

  • Larry gets cover article in Integrative Biology

  • Pinar gets cover aricle in Advanced Functional Materials

  • Dr. Bashir's photo on the Washington Post feature

  • Gregory Damhorst featured in UI Foundation article

  • Xin Tang, Piyush get cover article in Soft Matter

  • Adarsh joins University of Louisiana, Ruston as Assistant Professor

  • LIBNA Director, students helping to lead Global Health Initiative

  • April 1, 2011, Vincent Chan one of the winners of poster award in BioE day at UIUC

  • 2011 Bionanotechnology Summer Institute Call for Applications

  • Adarsh gets cover article in Advanced Functional Material

  • Nick gets cover article in Lab on Chip

  • November 15, 2010
    Microsensors offer first look at whether cell mass affects growth rate
    A team University of Illinois researchers led by electrical and computer engineering and bioengineering professor Rashid Bashir have developed an array of microsensors to measure the relationship between cell mass and growth rate.

  • October 1, 2010
    NIH establishes cancer nanotechnology training center at Illinois
    A recently announced grant from the National Institutes of Health will establish a new M-CNTC: Midwest Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Funded by the NIH/NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer, the M-CNTC will serve as a regional hub, partnering with the Mayo Clinic, University of Illinois at Chicago, Washington University at Saint Louis, and the Indiana University School of Medicine.

  • September 16, 2010
    New IGERT grant will help train next generation of leaders
    The University of Illinois has recently been awarded a five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) program aimed at producing the next generation of intellectual leaders who will define the new frontiers of Cellular & Molecular Mechanics and Bio-Nanotechnology (CMMB).
    • August 10, 2010
      Prof. Bashir is quoted in a Science review article
      Who needs labels? Whether based on optical, mechanical, or electrical detection, label-free methods can probe molecular pas de deux in their native, unadulterated states. As a result, they are faster, simpler, and more physiological than their labeled counterparts.
    • June 11, 2008
      Living cantilever arrays for characterization of mass of single live cells in fluids
      How much does a cell weigh? US chemists are using miniature cantilevers to find out. 'Cell mass is directly related to cell growth and division,' says Rashid Bashir at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In an effort to understand the role a cell's mass plays in these processes, Bashir and colleagues have designed a device to measure an individual cell's mass as it grows in fluid. more >>

    • September 6, 2006
      Nanoscale cantilevers behave anomalously
      Normally a cantilever's resonant frequency decreases when molecules attach to it – a finding that is the basis of nanomechanical sensing devices. But now researchers from Purdue University, US, have found that the resonant frequency of some nanoscale cantilevers may actually increase on the addition of molecules. more >>